Do you want a front porch? The front porch is a gateway to memories

The front porch is a vestige of an older, simpler way of life when families sat outside and neighbors visited with one another. Once a place for relaxation, the front porch faded in popularity due to an evolving modern life that brought about air conditioning and backyard decks, according to www.houzz.com. But the architectural feature is making a strong comeback.





There’s no easier way to add square footage to your home than to maximize the transition areas outside your property. Households can utilize the porch for additional entertaining space or for solitude. Need some inspiration? Check out Better Homes and Gardens for style ideas.




Diane Foreman, a design consultant with Neil Kelly Co. notes that the porch is, at minimum, a transitional space between the home’s exterior and interior. But the porch is also a holding place of “intangibles,” sensory experiences and memories about childhood, grandparents, and neighbors.





Seattle Times writer Tyrone Beason sums it up this way:





“The duality of the front porch is intriguing. It is a part of the house and yet it is a part of the streetscape. It is a private space but, then again, there’s nothing private about it. You can watch the world go by there — but the world can also watch you.”





Beason reminds us that a well used and aesthetically appealing front porch adds valuable space to homeowners and curb appeal to the home, which can increase the overall value of the property.

For more information on Burien Real Estate




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Posted on July 26, 2013 at 6:28 pm
Dustin Keeth | Category: Blog | Tagged , , , , , , ,

To shingle or not to shingle?

The Shingle artchitectural style is singularly American and stands in contrast to the nineteenth-century Victorian houses of the same era. The New England school of architecture reacted against the ornamental Victorian revival styles and created a new design that is considered America’s first modern house. Though it began on the East Coast, the style can be seen across America and especially in the Pacific Northwest and Great Lakes states. While towers, gables, and complex rooflines showcase some flourish, the Shingle style sets itself apart from its Victorian cousins with its streamlined appearance.

Posted on July 13, 2012 at 4:00 pm
Dustin Keeth | Category: Blog | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Kitchen islands aren’t going away

Better Homes & Gardens The kitchen island is often the hub of the home, the place where family members and guests gather to eat and socialize. While the island’s function remains the same as it has been for years, its look and feel are changing. “Pare it down to the basics, and anything else is a great addition but not necessary,” says Samantha Emmerling, a senior editor at House Beautiful, as reported in the Chicago Tribune . She notes that since most homeowners want an area for prep, additional counter space, seating, and storage, the form of the actual island ought to follow its function

Posted on May 8, 2012 at 4:00 pm
Dustin Keeth | Category: Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,